Andrew Bradt

J&J questions fairness of hip implant trial, $1-billion verdict

Andrew Bradt quoted by The Globe and Mail, Dec. 7, 2016

Andrew Bradt … noted the U.S. Supreme Court has held punitive damages should be no more than 10 times compensatory damages. The $1.041-billion award was mainly punitive, with just $32-million in compensatory damages. Bradt said the final award could be even lower than $320-million, since the high court has also said punitive damages awards should be closely tied to plaintiffs’ injuries rather than as a broader deterrent.

J&J questions fairness of hip implant trial

Andrew Bradt quoted by PharmaLive, Dec. 7, 2016

Andrew Bradt, a professor at University of California Berkeley School of Law, noted the U.S. Supreme Court has held punitive damages should be no more than 10 times compensatory damages. The $1.041 billion award was mainly punitive, with just $32 million in compensatory damages.

Judges should have to OK MDL settlements

Andrew Bradt co-writes for Daily Journal (registration required), Nov. 8, 2016

In many ways MDL practice resembles class action practice. And without the judge providing a signal that the deal is worth taking, individuals may be left in the dark when deciding whether to accept. In an MDL-dominated litigation landscape, judges should embrace an information-intermediary role by expressing an opinion on the fairness of proposed mass settlements.

Lyft sued over fatal crash after settlement delay

Andrew Bradt quoted in San Francisco Chronicle, April 18, 2016

Still, he said, Lyft’s responses are unlikely to play well in the court of public opinion — and could hurt the company’s reputation. “It seems like misdirection if one of their main selling points is protection by an insurance policy, but the realities of recovering under that policy are extremely onerous,” Bradt said.

Scholars say MDL filings increase, compete with class actions

Andrew Bradt quoted in Legal Newsline, March 22, 2013

“When we have large-scale litigation, the demands on the system are such that we have to have an efficient way to resolve it,” Bradt said. “It doesn’t make sense for there to be 10,000 cases in 10,000 courts across the country. It makes sense for there to be some kind of consolidated proceeding that prevents inefficient duplication of litigation.”