Melissa Murray

UC law schools awarded millions after bank’s loss in court

Melissa Murray quoted by The Recorder (registration required), March 29, 2017

The Sundquists are among thousands of Californians who have suffered mortgage trauma in the past decade, wrote Interim UC Berkeley Law Dean Melissa Murray in a statement. “The case is in its infancy; this is the first stage of what could be a long, drawn-out appeals process,” Murray wrote. “But it’s vital that the issue of consumer fraud remain in the public domain. At the law school, we have long-recognized the importance of this area of law, which is reflected in our current curriculum, our consumer rights work, and our new hire of a professor with expertise in consumer bankruptcy law.”

“Elections have consequences”: What we can expect from a Justice Neil Gorsuch

Melissa Murray quoted by Salon, March 25, 2017

The Golden State, Murray said, should above all be worried by what she and other legal scholars believe is Gorsuch’s most radical and far-reaching judicial prejudice — his extreme skepticism and hostility to the agency authority enshrined in a doctrine called the “Chevron deference,” after the 1984 Supreme Court case Chevron v. Natural Resources Defense Council.

Fight over immigration ban continues

Melissa Murray interviewed by KQED-TV News, Feb. 10, 2017

“On appeal to the Supreme Court, it’s the same set of questions: whether the government has met its burden to show that the ban should be reinstated, or whether challenger states have shown that there’s a good reason to withhold enforcement of the ban while more information is gathered. … It won’t be the kind of elaborate discussion of merits you would ordinarily see in a case that is squarely about the constitutionality of the order. … In the event that the president wants an order quickly, the Supreme Court might not be the way to go.”

UCLA law professor Adam Winkler & Interim Dean, Berkeley Law Melissa Murray

Melissa Murray interviewed by Tavis Smiley, Jan. 25, 2017

“The issue was to create doubt in the minds of the American people about what the media says so that, when the media does begin to report on more egregious breaches, there isn’t the trust that previously existed. So this is a two-fold strategy to, one, chill reporter conduct and free journalism and, two, to establish a baseline level of distrust between the media and the American people.”

What happens to a feminist dream deferred?

Melissa Murray co-writes for The Nation, Jan. 12, 2017

So what happens to a feminist dream deferred? Does it wither and die? Or does it explode in indignation—moving beyond the existing paradigm to become a bolder, more progressive version of itself? The answer is obvious. It has to be—for our daughters and for ourselves.

Supreme Court term limits would create their own problems

Melissa Murray writes for The New York Times, Room for Debate, March 19, 2016

Term-limited justices might aspire to other political offices, or positions in business, and these post-term aspirations might shape their judicial decision-making on the court. For all its problems, life tenure was intended to insulate judges — and their decisions — from these pressures.